Healthy Dog Food – What’s In Your Bag?

Choosing the right healthy dog food can be one of the most important decisions that you make for your dog. One benefit is that you can be sure of providing your pet with all the nutrients that are necessary for a healthy and strong animal. You will avoid expensive visits to the vet while also ensuring that man’s best friend provides you with companionship for a long time. Finding the best foods for your pet is simply a matter of reading the labels and understanding the ingredients that are included in the product.

Here are some suggestions for buying the best product for your dog:

A great product is one that has high levels of proteins. Dogs are carnivorous by nature and their digestive system is designed to digest raw meat. Therefore, a great meal is one that contains raw meat because this is more nutritious for your pet. Protein helps to build your dog’s immune system as well as facilitate his growth. High quality protein should form about a fifth of your dog’s diet, and this can be provided in the form of chicken or even lamb as opposed to meat byproducts or a bone meal.

The carbohydrate content in the healthy dog food should be in the right amount because too many carbohydrates can cause your dog to become bloated and have excessive gas. Although carbohydrates in the right amount are good for your dog, these are usually used as fillers in most commercial products and so you need to choose foods that have less of carbohydrates.

Fat is also an important part of a healthy diet. Some of the most common forms of fat in commercial products are lard, poultry fat, tallow, cotton seed oil as well as hydrogenated vegetable oils. You should read the label carefully because most products contain too much fat in them. Adult dogs need a minimum of five percent fat in their diet and a maximum of fifteen percent.

If you are providing dry healthy dog food then you need to compare brands in order to find the best product for your pet. You need to understand the ingredients that have been used to make these products. If you are unsure about a particular ingredient then you need to do come research. You can consult with your local veterinarian, research on the internet, or visit your local public library to find more information on the proper feeding of your dog.

Make sure there are no artificial ingredients, meat by products or chemicals in the products that you buy for your dog. You should also check to see if the product has been formulated to suit the needs of your dog. For example, some products are formulated for overweight dogs, senior dogs, or dogs with allergies.

Be sure to check the expiration date on any product that your purchase. Stores make every effort to remove expired items from the shelf, however, checking this information is in the best interest of both you and your dog.

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Homemade Healthy Dog Treats

Homemade healthy dog treats

 

 

Homemade healthy dog treats are relatively simple to make, they certainly are a better option for your pampered pooch, and they are fast becoming the number one preferred dog snack. Making your own homemade healthy dog treats has become quite popular since there are many recipes available online.

Why Homemade Healthy Dog Treats Are A Better Option

The primary reason for the increasing preference towards homemade healthy dog treats is the assurance of a healthier treat. Commercially manufactured dog treats use a variety of additives and chemicals to increase the treat’s shelf life. Artificial ingredients are less healthy for your dog compared to natural and freshly made ingredients.  Making your own dog treats gives you the advantage of adding the nutrients that are specifically needed by your dog and eliminating those that can potentially be harmful. If your dog has specific dietary needs, preparing the treats yourself guarantees that the dietary/food recommendations from your veterinarian are always consistent.

A Budget Friendly And Cost Efficient Option

Cooking your own meals has always been less expensive than going to a restaurant every day. This is also true when it comes to dog treats. Although purchasing dog treats tends to be faster and saves you prep time, the accumulation of money spent over a period of time may put your savings at risk. Making your own homemade healthy dog treats may actually provide an opportunity for you to cut down on expenses. Instead of buying expensive commercially prepared dog treats, prepare your homemade treats using ingredients that are in season. Seasonal ingredients are often available in large quantities, therefore, they are less expensive than other ingredients. You can save even more money if you buy your ingredients in bulk.

A Variety Of Flavors

Eating the same food over and over  again can diminish the pleasure that food gives. Treats are often used for basic dog training. These treats can eventually be tasteless for your dog’s palate if given all the time. Home cooked and prepared dog treats contain interchangeable ingredients you can use. A veggie biscuit can be turned into a peanut butter biscuit just by replacing the vegetable with a crushed peanut butter mixture. Miniature beef cookies can easily become chicken cookies just by changing one ingredient.

A Bonding Experience In The Kitchen

Preparing your own homemade healthy dog treats allows you to experiment with different recipes and to discover your dog’s own preferences. Cooking in the kitchen is a bonding experience for you and your dog and the best food critic none other than your dog himself.  Dogs are much happier and more active when given treats that contain a variety of flavors and also include nutrients that are essential for them. The time spent preparing homemade healthy dog treats provides many opportunities for dog owners to get better acquainted with their dog.  Get creative in the kitchen – you will never know how much fun you can have until you try it yourself.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Dog Names – 7 Puppy Naming Tips

This is a guest post by Jennifer McVey

You’ve picked out the perfect puppy.  You spent hours on the internet, researching the right breed for you and your family.  Then you went from breeder to breeder or humane society to humane society, meeting and greeting pups until you find just the right match.

Now what?  He needs a name!

Over the course of its life, you will use your dog’s name more than 35,000 times.  So be sure you’re picking a name you can live with and love.

With these seven simple steps, the key to finding the perfect puppy name is at your fingertips!

  • Dogs understand short commands.  Easy names with two or fewer syllables work well.
  • Your puppy’s name shouldn’t sound like any commands.  “Stacy” and “stay” are too close for comfort.  Such a name will only confuse the issue.
  • Remember, you’ll be using your pup’s name in public.  “Boner” may be cute among your fellow fraternity members, but it won’t go over well at the veterinarian.
  • Make your kids part of the decision process.  Kids like it simple, too, so if calling your Champion Cavalier King Spaniel “Bootsie” works for them, consider keeping the hoity toity name strictly for AKC purposes.
  • You may think it’s an honor to name your pup after you’re favorite Uncle Norbert.  Naming your baby after him may keep you in the will, but naming your puppy after him won’t.
  • If you’re bringing home an older dog, ideally, stick with the name it already owns.  Can’t stand it because “Barney” was the first boy who broke your heart?  Then stick with similar sounds when choosing a new dog name. “Barney” morphs into “Farley” easily.
  • Once you’ve chosen a name, try it out for a day or so.  You’ll know right away whether it’s a keeper.  If not, there’s always more puppy names on your list!

Take a look around you.  Everywhere you are, you’ll find a variety of terrific ideas on what to name your pooch.

At first glance, a couple things will stand out about your new puppy.  Enjoy him or her for a day or two and take these into consideration.

  • Appearance.  What’s your dog look like?  His color, size, and personal style inspires a variety of name choices.  “Stubbs” would be a great name for a dachshund pup.  Or you may call a cream colored cock-a-poo “Buffy.”
  • Personality.  Given a couple of days, your new dog’s personality will really shine through.    Try “Cuddles” for the sweet little guy who loves to get cozy or “Puddles” for the pooch who can’t seem to find the doggie door.

If you want to go beyond the basics, many famous dog names or foreign dog names can fit the bill.  Consider these favorite puppy names when making your decision.

  • Celebrity puppy names.  Today, pooches have more celebrity following than their famous owners.  Chew on “Lola,” a name used by both Hilary Duff and the Osbournes.
    TV dogs.  “Scooby” and “Astro” come to mind if you want to honor a famous TV pup.
  • Movie dogs.  Cool movies and cool dog names seem to go hand in hand.  Cool Hand Luke’s “Blue” would be a fitting label for a variety of dogs.  Or try “Bodie,” from the weeper Steel Magnolias.
  • Comic dogs.  “Snoopy” will always be a favorite, but also consider “Daisy” or “Odie.”
    German dog names.  For starters, try out “Fritz” or “Kaiser.”
  • Irish dog names.  “Finn” fits well for any pup, as does “Murphy,” which just happens to mean “hound of the sea.”
  • French puppy names.  “Pierre” and “Gigi” are top contenders for any dog, especially those with a little oo-la-la in their genes.

The choices are endless.  However, with these simple tips and some thought, before long, you’ll have found the perfect puppy name!

Want to find a puppy name?  Visit http://www.favorite-puppy-names.com for a great list of   dog names and naming tips to help make the puppy naming process easy and fun!

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Best Puppy Toys For Learning And Playing

It’s no secret that Bichon puppies love to play! They seem to have boundless energy and are on the constant lookout for something fun to play with. Toys are a great way to help you play with your puppy, or to distract them while you take a little break.

Here are some of  the best puppy toys to consider buying for your Bichon Frise to distract, train, and just have fun:

Stuffed Toys – You’ll find many stuffed toys that are shaped in all sorts of amusing critters and objects. These are great play toys especially for puppy because they are soft and give puppy something to sink those tiny little baby teeth into while offering a cuddly factor. Be aware of broken seams and stuffing coming out.

Squeaky Toys – Some puppies love to get a reaction from their toys and squeaky toys are perfect for that. If your puppy has a hunting lineage, you may notice there will be a ‘kill’ in the making with this sort of toy. Once the toy is ‘killed’ (the squeaker removed) the puppy may lose interest in the toy. The constant squeaking may be a bit disturbing since puppies don’t really care what you’re doing when they’re ready to play. If puppy is very young, do pay attention as the squeaking device may be small enough to swallow if they should happen to get it out.

Chew Toys – Buy hard plastic ‘bones’ and real rawhide, or other bones and toys for puppy to chew on. Be sure to limit the amount of time puppy chews on the real rawhide as it is difficult to digest and you want to avoid letting them break off and swallow large chunks. A big supply of good chew toys and bones are a necessary investment. Buying bones specially made to hold up for a long time will help the budget.

Balls – Puppies love chasing balls. Your puppy will bat a ball around and keep entertained without any help from you. However, the real joy your puppy will have is playing fetch with you. Make sure the ball is large enough so it doesn’t pose a choking hazard. Also, make sure the ball is solid enough not to be chewed up easily. Tennis balls are a favorite choice for many dog owners.

Ropes – Tugging on a rope and carrying it around is always fun. You can buy thick, strong ropes at the pet store just for this purpose. Be sure not to get too aggressive with this play. You are probably quite a big bigger than your dog, and certainly your puppy, and you can tug too hard and hurt your puppy’s jaw, neck, or teeth. Keep the play more about chasing the puppy while he runs with the rope than about tugging it away from him or her.

Frisbees – Toys that fly far are perfect for playing fetch. This is an opportunity for you to teach puppy to retrieve and return. Find a safe, wide open field and your puppy will run off a lot of energy. The exercise is great for both of you.

When choosing the toys you want for your puppy, be sure to keep some safety and training issues in mind. Here are a few:

Watch for choking hazards – The easiest way to avoid buying toys that may present chocking hazards for puppies is to buy them from a good pet store. Pet stores have a big selection of puppy-safe toys to choose from. If you do get puppy toys that you’re not sure about, check them over for objects that are sewn or glued on that won’t hold up to your puppy’s chewing. Just cut them off before giving to your puppy.

Only keep a few toys out – If you’ve bought your puppy a lot of toys, don’t present them all at once. One or two toys at a time will excite your puppy; any more than that will just be overwhelming and your puppy may ignore them all. Then, as old toys get destroyed or no longer useful, introduce one new toy at a time.

Keep toys in a bin nearby – To keep your own sanity you’ll probably want to have a bin or toy box for the puppy toys. This is a place where puppy can always find them and you can show him where they go when finished. That way, when puppy wants to play he knows exactly where to go to find the toys. You will also be able to quickly grab something to distract puppy when needed.

Puppy fun time is one of the great joys of being a puppy, and a puppy parent. Make sure you take the time to get your puppy the best toys for the hard work of playing. Be sure you also get in all the playtime you can with your puppy. Time flies quickly, and your puppy won’t be little for long!

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Bichon Frise Care and Grooming

This is a guest post from Elvis Foote.

Bichon Frise are a very sociable dog from the time that they are puppies on through adulthood.  Bichon Frises have an easy, happy disposition.  A Bichon Frisé (French, literally meaning Curly lap dog; often spelled Bichon Frise in English) is a small breed of dog.

  The Bichon Frise was developed in the Mediterranean area, when a Barbet (a large water spaniel breed) was crossed with small white lapdogs.  The Bichon Frise of today has its descent in the Bichon Tenerife breed line, which found its way to the Mediterranean area, onto the Canary Islands or rather, “the Island of Tenerife. 

In the 1980s, the Bichon Frise was part of the “Yuppie Puppies” choice of the majority population, and everyone just HAD to have one.  Bichon Frises make an excellent addition to the family.  Bichon Frise are affectionate, cuddly and just plain happy to see people.

The disposition of the Bichon Frise is sweet, perky, bouncy, active, and very playful with sporadic bursts of energy that leads them into many unknown adventures–usually beyond the fenced in yard or when they get loose from the leash, even though they are considered to be gentle creatures.  Bichon Frises can be hard to house train; crate training may be a successful technique.  Bichon Frises can conform to apartment life fairly easily.  Bichon Frise also are very intelligent and quick learners.

Bichon Frise, as with many sociable breeds, are not suited to being left alone all day.  Bichon Frises have a life span of 12-13 years and have litters of 4-5 pups.  An independent dog, the Bichon Frise bond well with adults and children and is also very highly intelligent, affectionate, charming, and self-assured.  Serious dog lovers who own, or want to own a Bichon Frise would rather invest their valuable Internet time on a website that truly UNDERSTANDS this amazing breed. 

Training

Training must be gentle and firm, with no harsh corrections or scolding.  Training the Bichon works well with food treats along with the leash and collar.  A crate is usually the best method of training.  The puppy should come to see his/her crate as his personal space so avoid using it as discipline for bad behavior to maximize house training potential.

Roughhousing is definitely out with this guy, and play training is in.  This breed requires gentle and firm training, as they are so gentle and sensitive that any harsh training or negative corrections will have an opposite effect on the puppy or adult dog.  But all trainers/owners will eventually need a collar and leash to begin the training-the many types available will depend on the person doing the training, as each one is a matter of personal preference and what the dog needs.

Some of the training collar tools that are acceptable for the Bichon training, as chain or nylon chokers will matt and tangle in their hair, are the buckle collars, leather-training collars, or even the reversed pinch collars.  The head collar is becoming very popular as a training tool for most dogs in training classes.  Positive reinforcement and gentle training are the choice training of the day, with kindness, persistence, and patience.  As far as training is concerned, this breed often proves to be hard to housebreak, but likes to learn.  The Bichon does not require aggressive training, and likes challenges.  These dogs need training and exercise at the minimum one walk a day.

Grooming

Grooming requirements are based on coat type and the size of the dog.  Grooming is recommended on a daily basis to avoid matting.  Professional grooming is recommended every 4 weeks.  They are a non-shedding breed that requires daily grooming.  They require regular grooming, which can be expensive and/or time-consuming.

Because Bichons are so susceptible to skin problems and allergies, good grooming practices are very important.  Like all dogs that require frequent grooming, Bichons should be accustomed to grooming from a young age and care should be taken to keep grooming pleasurable.  Anyone considering a Bichon should carefully weigh the amount of time available for grooming, for the coat needs lots of attention.

But good grooming is required once shedding begins, as the undercoat needs to be removed once the weather begins to warm up or excessive shedding will leave piles of hair throughout the home.  High on the playfulness range, along with friendliness toward strangers, watchdog ability, and grooming requirements-anyone who purchases the Bichon will be a powder-puff challenge, to say the least.

To keep the Bichons soft white curly coat well cared for takes daily grooming and as the coat is white and non shedding, it also needs regular bathing and trimming.  There are two popular Bichon Frise grooming styles: a short, poodle-like coat or a long, puffy coat for a more rounded appearance.  For anyone wanting to learn to do the grooming on their own dogs, be prepared to make many mistakes along the way.

Conclusion

With proper attention, the Bichon Frise will develop into a wonderful companion animal.  Bichon Frise are a very sociable dog from the time that they are puppies on through adulthood.  So instead of wasting hours of your time scouring the Internet for specific info about the Bichon Frise, it’s all here in one place.  You can find out all you need to know about the Bichon Frise.  With thousands of Bichon Frise puppies for sale and hundreds of Bichon Frise dog breeders, you’re sure to find the perfect Bichon Frise puppy.

For this and other pet related topics please visit The Shoppbox Ebook Reviews.

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How To Train A Bichon Frise – Enroll Him In Obedience School To Learn The Ropes

If you want to learn how to train a Bichon Frise, take my advice – enroll him in obedience classes!  Puppy training classes are extremely popular these days and are even offered at local pet supply stores. You can purchase your training treats and train your dog in one convenient location. Dog training classes have brought the obedience school way of thinking to the forefront for dog owners at every level.  Here is an overview of what obedience, or training, school for your Bichon puppy can mean for you, and for your puppy: 

What is Obedience School

Obedience school is a place that pet owners take their puppies to teach them how to behave properly. Some schools will enroll the puppy and train them, while other schools enroll both the puppy and the pet owner in order to teach both how to properly behave.

Where do you find Obedience Schools

If you are interested in obedience school, you’re going to want to know where you can find a good, reputable school to enroll your beloved furry friend.  Here are a few suggestions:

Ask your local vet if he or she has any recommendations for obedience schools. Your veterinarian is sure to have some suggestions on schools as well as what to look for in a good school.

Ask at your local pet store. Some pet stores actually offer obedience training themselves. Check and see if there is one in your area. Many of these schools have the ‘parents’ join in the training right along with the puppy. These are usually very relaxed settings and are typically priced right because they are a group experience.

Many cities have local kennel clubs clubs that team up to provide obedience training for their members. Check to see if there are any clubs near you that you can join. If you dealt with a breeder when you got your puppy, they will have the information for you.

Dog groomers often have their finger on the pulse of pet events and service providers in the area. If you have a local groomer, ask and see if they can recommend any trainers.

What Does Obedience School Do

Taking your Bichon puppy to obedience school will help him become adjusted to living life with you and following your rules. You, the puppy parent, will also learn what to expect from your puppy. In obedience school, your puppy could learn some or all of the following:

Potty training

Following simple commands

Coming when called

Walking properly on a leash

Chewing only on toys, not hands or clothes

Keeping within given boundaries 

This may sound like a lot to ask of a new Bichon Frise puppy. It is and training takes time so don’t expect miracles right away. The key to any kind of training is consistency and practice, practice, practice!

Can You Train Your Puppy at Home

Of course you can train your puppy without signing up for a class. However, a training class will likely save you time and stress by showing you training tools that may have taken you more time to figure out on your own, if at all. Training classes get you off on the right foot with puppy and help eliminate the second guessing that goes with training on your own. Trust me on this one!

The Socializing Advantage to Training Class

One thing that you can’t do at home if you have just one puppy is socialize your Bichon puppy with other dogs and people. Obedience training is a great way to do this and get your puppy used to being social in a variety of situations. This is important so that your puppy does not mature to be shy or aggressive around other animals or people. 

Have fun and I wish you all the best in your training.

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How To Travel With A Bichon Frise

This is a guest post by John Jackson

Going on a trip or vacation is no reason to leave one of the most treasured members of the family behind. Of course, the owner of a Bichon Frise would never leave theirs alone. Friends and kennels are out of the question for their prized dogs, as well. Planning ahead and using common sense can make traveling in the car with your Bichon Frise a pleasurable event. Your Bichon Frise should be in good health, used to traveling, be well behaved, and be trained to stop barking on command. Incessant barking and continuous illness in the car can put a severe damper on the drive if it is very long.

There are some necessary supplies that you will need in order to travel with your Bichon Frise. Your pet needs either a pet seat belt or a crate/carrier to guarantee his safety in the car. Even if he doesn’t normally wear a collar, he should while traveling. That collar should include tags that provide proof of ID, license, and rabies. You should carry an extra leash and collar. Your Bichon Frise should be comfortable during his trip as well. Your dogs favorite blanket, toys and treats should be included on the list, along with essentials such as water, food, a can opener, bowls and plastic bags for cleanup. Carry a list with his license, microchip, vaccinations, and rabies tag numbers, as well as a picture of your Bichon Frise in case of emergency or loss. A first aid kit, including his prescription medications, dog shampoo, brush, and toothpaste and toothbrush to help maintain grooming while away from home should be packed as well. An easy and convenient way to carry all of your doggie supplies is a laundry or picnic basket.

The safest way for your pet to travel in the car is in a pet crate or carrier placed on the back seat. If you choose to use a pet seat belt, you should keep the windows rolled up, as it is dangerous for your dog to stick his head out of the window. Teach your dog to enter the car before you and exit the car after you, always wearing his leash. Frequent breaks for your Bichon Frise to drink some water, get a small amount of exercise and relieve himself are important. However, never, ever leave your dog in a locked car, unattended, for any reason.

More and more places are welcoming pets into their places of businesses, a far cry from year ago. Quiet, well-behaved doggy guests are often welcomed to hotel and motel chains, resorts, campgrounds, and B&B’s located throughout America and Canada. It is important to inquire beforehand about rules regarding pets, however, as some places only allow small dogs, such as the Bichon Frise, or dogs up to a certain weight. Large dogs may be required to remain in a kennel or carrier. Some establishments charge a small fee, which may be refundable if no damage is done, and some establishments may not charge a fee at all. Always make arrangements ahead of time to be sure your destination will accept your Bichon Frise and confirm that any rules are not going to be a problem. Keeping your Bichon Frise quiet, walking him only in designated areas, and cleaning up after your dog both inside and outside the room establishes you as a trustworthy pet owner. By being an irresponsible pet owner, you make it difficult for those owners that do respect other people’s privacy and property. To have a wonderful trip with your Bichon Frise, it is simply necessary for you to spend a little time beforehand getting organized and covering all of your bases.

http://www.greatdogsite.com. For more information on the Bichon Frise, please visit our page http://www.greatdogsite.com/breeds/details/Bichon_Frise/.

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Potty Training A Bichon – Success Depends On You

Potty training a Bichon is not that difficult, however, your Bichon’s success depends on you. New puppies are great fun. They’re cute and cuddly, they’re playful and friendly. Bichon puppies are  tiny white fur balls who are so adorable and charming that you almost forget one of the biggest challenges you face - potty training.

Potty training a Bichon, also referred to as housebreaking or housetraining,  is rarely easy. You might find it frustrating and even upsetting at times. There are, however, ways to make sure you get through the process successfully. Here are 7 tips to get you and your Bichon started off on the right foot, or paw:

Know Your Puppy’s Potty Dance

Watch for an catch your Bichon in the act when possible, so you can teach him the right way to go potty. Watch your puppy for signs of  the ‘potty dance.’ These signs often come right after eating or drinking and very often after playing. After you feed your puppy, watch for signs of sniffing, circling, or squatting. After you play with your puppy, look for the same pee and poop signs..   

Assign a Designated Potty Spot

When you catch your puppy getting ready, you’ll need to show him where to go potty. If possible,  take your puppy outside in order to help him understand that the inside of the house is not a potty spot. If that’s not possible because puppy is too little to wait until you can get outside to the potty spot, then you will likely need to paper-train him first with a spot in the house, preferably close to the door you use to take your puppy outside. Your Bichon puppy will be able to hold on longer and longer as time goes by, making it possible to plan an outdoor excursion to the potty spot.

Reward Good Behavior

If your Bichon goes potty in the right spot, a reward is in order. This can be your praise and affection or it could be a special treat just for potty time. A mixture of treats, praise, and playtime works very well for puppies. Your puppy wants to please you and play with you, so your praise and play means everything to him and he will do anything to get it – including going potty in the right place.

Schedule Potty Time

Once you have learned the ‘potty dance’ signs and understand your Bichon’s potty habits, you can begin to set up a schedule so you don’t have to watch so closely. Typically speaking, most puppies will want to go potty about 30 to 40 minutes after they have eaten, after waking up from a nap, or after they’ve played hard. With this in mind, you are now ready to schedule these times for yourself. Feed your puppy at a time when you know you’ll have time in 30 minutes or so to take him for a potty run. Set up your playtime in the same fashion and include that 30 to 40 minute time at the end for potty time.  If you stay consistent with your schedule, you can relax a bit.

 Consistency is Key

You must be consistent with your puppy. If you are not dedicated to the training, you can expect failure. Your puppy is a creature of habit, therefore, if you are providing treats as a reward during potty training, be prepared with them immediately. If potty time is 30 minutes  after eating, make sure you get your Bichon out to the potty spot in 30 minutes. Remember, if you are not consistent, it is your failure, not puppy’s failure.

Give it Time

Your puppy will have accidents. There will be times when he will happily go outside to the potty spot, only to look at you with a puzzled expression. Then, just as you return to the house, your puppy will suddenly understand, and go potty on the floor. Be prepared for this and don’t get too stressed by it. You’re looking for improvement over time. Yes, time. As long as there is a forward progression, you have nothing to worry about. Patience will be your best friend while potty training a Bichon.

Limit Food and Drink at Bedtime

When your Bichon puppy is very young, you can’t expect more than approximately one hour of sleep for every month since their birth. So, if you have a three month old puppy, expect to set the alarm for every three hours during the night, or wake up to a puddle or pile. In order to stretch this time out while waiting for growth and nature to take its course, it’s a good idea to limit food and water about three hours before bedtime. Schedule your puppy’s feedings earlier in the day to help both you and your puppy get a full night’s rest.

By following these seven tips and your Bichon should be happily housetrained in no time.

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How To Teach Your Dog To Come When Called

You can teach your dog to come when called if you are willing to put in the time and effort that it will take. Teaching your dog to come is an extremely important part of the training process. This basic command can highlight the difference between  a well trained, obedient dog and an unruly one. There are several steps which can be taken to ensure that a dog learns how to come on command quickly and effectively.

Teach your dog to come as early as possible in the training process. This is extremely important because it could prevent difficult situations both with other dogs and with people. If you are out in the park and another dog becomes aggressive then being able to call your dog to you immediately could ensure its safety. It is also a valuable command if your own dog becomes too excitable.

When you begin the training to teach your dog to come, you must make sure that you create an environment that is suitable for learning. A busy park with many people and dogs will be not be a suitable learning environment because there will be too many distractions for your dog and he will be unable to concentrate properly. Instead, choose a quiet area, either inside your home or in your backyard, provided there are no distractions.

Your dog should already be familiar with the sit and stay commands. These two commands should be mastered before you teach your dog to come. The dog should be instructed to sit. You will then show him your hand which contains one of his favorite food treats. Close your hand, instruct your dog to stay, and then slowly back away three steps. Call your dog to you by saying his name and then the command “come.”

It is vitally important to always use the same command and the same tone of voice when you teach your dog to come. This repetition will ensure that your dog learns the training completely. Once your dog comes to you he should be given the treat immediately and he should be praised enthusiastically. The dog should feel confident that by obeying the come command they will be rewarded.

 This process should be repeated as many times as is necessary until the command is obeyed flawlessly. Again, repetition enforces the learning. The task can be made harder by gradually increasing the distance between you and your dog. When you think your dog is ready you can try the exercise outside, perhaps in a quiet area of the park, remembering always to have a treat to hand as a reward. As time goes on, the treats can be reduced and praise will be enough to reinforce the learning.

It may be advisable at this point to invest in a retractable leash. In this way you can perform the training while still being in control if your dog gets distracted by outside influences.  

Teaching your dog to come is not difficult, but it is a vitally important step in the training process. It simply requires consistent repetition of the process, and continued positive reinforcement for your dog. If this is done properly, you will have a happy and obedient pet in a short space of time.

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Important Things About the Bichon Frise

This is a guest post from Mary Stevenson

Among the small dog breeds, the Bichon Frise is one of the friendliest. Unlike dachshunds, pomeranians, jack russell terriers, and other small dogs the Bichon Frise is not a loud, prone to yapping kind of dog. This bodes well for your ears, and your surrounding neighbors’ ears.

Especially for a family having children it is sometimes difficult to find the “not too hot, not too cold” dog. Because of their reputation for snapping and a general irritation for the younger homo sapiens, most parents have a tendency to shy away from smaller breeds of dogs. This isn’t the case with the delightful Bichon Frise. This is a dog that revels in humans’ attention and socializing. They love the company of humans, adults and children a like.

The Bichon Frise Cradle Of Life

Bichon Frise is actually a crossbreed between a Barbet water spaniel and a Poodle. Breeders from countries around the Mediterranean Sea claimed the paternity of the breed, but it was officially registered in France. The name is French, but that accent is so Anglo-Saxon.

Its characteristic appearance is given by its coat, which is white as snow and full of curls, definitely resembling to the coat of a Poodle. Two little black round eyes and a button nose give the face…well, a face. Another curl is their tail that makes them looking like prancing when they are walking. But they usually are not walking, they are carried around by their loving owners. They love to be carried in their arms. And the owners like to carry them.

While the Bichon Frise is highly intelligent and quick to learn tricks, house breaking does not seem to be one of them. Of course, you can get a house broken one, but you can easily unlearn it. You are going to have accidents; but with a dog that does not weigh more than ten pounds, it’s not like you will have to clean up after an elephant. You just need to be a patient owner and trainer. The easiest way is to let it play with lots of puppy potty training pads.

The grooming activities and the time required is another aspect to consider before getting a Bichon Frise dog. They’re like Delta Burke during her “Designing Women” days; they require a lot of grooming and can be high maintenance in that area. At home they require a daily brush an every week to be avoided the tangles and the matted spots. Professional grooming is highly recommended every four to six weeks. You may keep their coat very short if you like the “puppy cut” look. But there will be no more curls to play with, so it may be better to daily brush the long haired coat. You must not try to professionally groom your dog yourself. Think of those home-made haircuts your mother was so fond of giving you and call the nearest pet salon.

The Bichon Frise really is a wonderful little dog. Always research before deciding of getting one at home. You may find it fun as well as educational as you read up on their history, temperaments, appearance and grooming habits, and personality. And it is worth to know every little thing if we are speaking about a pedigreed pet.

The [http://www.bichonfriseguide.com/bichon/]Bichon Frise is not a loud, prone to yapping kind of dog. You will find a dog that revels in attention and socializing. You must also consider the grooming time before getting yourself a [http://www.bichonfriseguide.com/bichon/]Bichon Frise dog.

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